Scenarios - Converting Static Content Into Interactive E-learning

January 3, 2017

"How do I make the training course more interactive?"

 

If I’d have to design classroom training, the answer would be easy: add a group activity. Throw in a challenge or scenario and have participants debate it. People like being involved in group activities and from what I’ve experienced so far, these activities and discussions add a lot of value to the process of learning.

 

Since the current project I’m working on involves converting classroom training into interactive e-learning, you can imagine the work brings its own challenges.

 

In this article I am showing you how I re-framed an ILT (instructor-led training) group activity into an interactive e-learning experience.

 

THE BACKGROUND

 

I did a Conflict Management e-learning course recently and the following piece is an extract from the static content that needed to be developed in Articulate Storyline.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The challenge was to take this ILT group activity and turn it into a knowledge check scenario for e-learning. Please note that the key in this example is to create an interaction with the learner, without redesigning the course content.

THE DESIGN

I decided to create a knowledge check activity by converting the content into Freeform Questions. By placing learners in realistic situations, they practice making decisions that result in meaningful feedback and consequences.  

 

First step was to present the learner with a challenge. I introduced characters and created triggered states to reinforce the message.

 

Next, I provided learners with a set of 5 choices and allowed them to make decisions.

 

 

Then, learners are provided with the appropriate consequences (feedback) for each of their choices.

 

 Finally, I introduced a slide to reinforce the best choice and give learners the option to take again the challenge or move to the next scenario.

 

THE RESULT

 

What I like best about this example is that it gives learners a choice to think and make decisions on their own. Even though they are not in a classroom group, they receive valuable, instant feedback. 

 

 

View published version here.

 

 

Bests,

 

Liliana

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© Liliana Cotoara 2016

Instructional Designer in Vancouver

liliana.cotoara@gmail.com